Photography & reality

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  • Re: somehting out of the context
    Sohrab,

    I don't know about the hole in the wall.. HCB has sometimes been seldom explanatory about his shooting conditions...

    I saw that documentary film "HCB : the impassioned eye" shot around year 2000, there's a scenewhere someone from a library was showing him precious national archives about HCB own work and which were supposed to be selected for an exhib.
    - About the first large print he was showed, HCB claimed he never took the photo but remembered it was one of his friend's whom he gave his camera to... the librarian almost fainted... fortunately, one of the person who accompanying the group told the librarian HCB often liked to joke and piss off serious people.
    - On the second print, HCB told he never saw such a bad enlargment... the librarian was getting nervous.
    - On the third print, HCB said he didn't like the image and wanted to have it to tear it into pieces, he tried to grab the precious print and they almost went to fight with the librarian preventing him to do so. Camera cut.

    Then you'll guess it's difficult with such an anarchist mind to get the truth from what he claimed to be to what has really happened.

    Cheers.
    L.
  • Re: somehting out of the context
    hey luko
    although i read about the gap in the fence, i found it <a hre="http://www.magnumphotos.com/cf/htm/CDocZ_MAG.aspx?Stat=DocThumb_DocZoom&o=&DT=ALB&E=2 TYRYD1D518O&Pass=&Total=125&Pic=26&SubE=2S5RYDI9CN RQ">the gap</a> as well
    but since you mentioned his antics.. i will be skeptical about whatever's written here :)
    take care
  • Re: Photography & reality; who's reality?
    First I want to say that I have been waiting for a thread like this to appear as Trekearth matures. It's wonderful, insightful and truly an open community.
    Just this week an old friend/colleague, a doctor of children's epidemiology, was explaining a study and its results in regards to children's readiness for education. " By the time a child reaches age three they have heard 30 million words." My immediate response was, "match that up with all the images of their immediate world and we have the future in the present." So in my imagination the rest of life is literally a cross-reference of analysis which produces the human condition. Photography therefore is documentation with endless interpretations, a continuum of humans exploring their world.

    In TL I posted a image of two loving friends, 13 yr.old girls in Jamaica. After hours of them exploring Trek earth and inquisitive questioning I asked them what picture of Jamaica they would like me to post. Much to my glee it was a photo of themselves which we had processed together. I asked why this particular image. They looked at each other and could not find the words to explain but just giggled encouraging me to just get on with the task.;-)
    Once again thanks for initiating this forum.
  • Re: Photography & reality
    Interesting and thought-provoking thread. It makes me think of my own work and how I interpret the world around me through the lens of my camera. I've noticed several things about my work, especially my landscapes: I try to eliminate people and people artifacts from my nature photos, I suppose because I want to show the 'ideal' of nature, so this reality is demonstrated by my outlook and paradigms I hold.

    Throughout the ages, verisimilitude (or the appearance of truth or reality) has been an elusive topic to define. In Europe, the Neoclassicists in the 17th century made up rules that strictly defined what verisimilitude was.

    Later, the Romanticists of the 19th century challenged those rules and claimed that emotion and intuition and nature were the most important concepts of capturing verisimilitude.

    In reaction to the Romanticists, Realism and Naturalism sprang up in the mid 19th century. Their proponents claimed that science and observation were the tools to reach verisimilitude.

    Of course, many 'isms' have arisen since that time, inlcuding surrealism, expressionism, absurdism, and many more.

    What is really fun about TE is that all of these styles (and more, because this is, delightfully, a world-wide site and NOT only European/American), can be found here on TE, all showing us the truth as it is interpreted by each individual photographer.

    We also often forget that through our photos, we try to communicate not only how a place, person or event LOOKED, but also how it FELT. We can add other senses, too: how it SOUNDED, or TASTED for instance. This makes photography a very complex communication medium, and one that takes much thought on the part of the photographer.

    TL was created in part because in our efforts to communicate all of these things, photographic manipulation was required or desired for some images.

    So capturing "reality" is indeed an interesting, relevant, and very important question with which we all must grapple at some point.
  • Re: Sontag
    I thought I'd mention for those that might be interested that Susan Sontag passed away 2004/12/28.