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  xuaxo 2010-01-12 12:40

Hi Mary,
Good record of the beautiful station with the Portuguese azulejos. The floor has also the typical calçada with black and white stones.
The people, rather melancholiac, seem also typical Portuguese.
Greetings,
Francisco

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Old 01-12-2010, 09:58 PM
akm akm is offline
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Default To xuaxo: Waitinj for the train

Hi Francisco,
I'm glad you liked this. I'm also glad I could get at leadt part of the nake in the calcada. As for the people, I thought perhaps they were tired of a long wait. I'm not sure I would call the Portuguese melancholy. I would definitely say reserved and a bit fatalistic but, being English, I appreciate that and can, as they say, relate! Greetings,
Mary
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Old 01-12-2010, 10:27 PM
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xuaxo xuaxo is offline
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Default Re: To xuaxo: Waiting for the train

I think you are right about the Portuguese. I'm not sure about using some English words. When I wrote 'melancholy' I was going to write 'sad', but I guessed it was too strong. Like you write, 'reserved' and 'fatalistic' are correct words about the Portuguese. I would say that most of us (I'm Portuguese too) relate with cordiality, courtesy and politeness, that for some foreigners may seem deceptive or even hypocritical. But it's not. Our courtesy, by most of us, it's heartfelt, even too candid sometimes.
Returning to your definition, the Portuguese are indeed fatalistic. For sure you know that the name of our national music, the fado, means 'fate', the same root for 'fatalistic'.
Greetings,
Francisco
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Old 01-12-2010, 11:57 PM
akm akm is offline
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Default Re: To xuaxo: Waiting for the train

I agree entirely about the cordiality, courtesy and politeness and I would add civility. I also suspect that, just as in England, the reserve is breaking down a bit and not quite what I encountered on my first assignment in Portugal in the early 1990s.
I found the greatest challenge was the level of secrecy on the part of many government agencies -- more than I've encountered in other countries, which I took to be possibly an expression of the national reserve. Everyone was shocked by what I revealed to them collectively about the impending uncoordinated development of the Setubal peninsula as a result of so many unshared plans. From what I've read, there aappears to have been a greater level of collaboration since then. On my second assignment, I proposed an interactive planning/design workshop and was warned that no one would speak up. I'm glad to say that the warning proved completely wrong and the participants were highly animated! Greetings,
Mary
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