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View of a ship returning to port in the village of Punta Umbria, return with the product of 12 hours in a charming and dangerous environment as is the sea, back to the main duty done to their families back to life, much do not return, that is the cause of joy to see the return of these beautiful boats.

Punta Umbria is a Spanish municipality in the province of Huelva, Andalusia. In 2010 it had 14,714 inhabitants. Its surface area is 38 km ² and has a density of 387.2 inhabitants / km ². Its geographical coordinates are 37 ° 10'N 6 ° 57'O. It is situated at an altitude of 6 meters and 20 kilometers from the provincial capital, Huelva. Today Punta Umbria presents an appearance very different from that which saw the British, whose presence has been the unique architecture of wooden houses in which they spent the summer and still are known as "houses of the English." One of the attractions of the city is just a house museum [1] which recreates the lifestyle of the British in this area of ​​Andalucia in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century.

Belonging to the municipality of Cartaya, until their segregation on April 26, 1963 was "rediscovered" in the previous century by English entrepreneurs of the Rio Tinto Company Limited, which made it the rest area. Today Punta Umbria presents an appearance very different from that which saw the British, whose presence has been the unique architecture of wooden houses in which they spent the summer and still are known as "houses of the English." One of the attractions of the city is just a house museum [2] which recreates the lifestyle of the British in this area of ​​Andalucia in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. If given a tour of Punta Umbria, you will see a kind of metal mill there has long

Punta Umbria and more specifically the Portil (belonging to the municipality of Punta Umbria), has much to do in a key stage in the Allied victory in World War II, as well it was D-Day (June 6, 1944, the Normandy invasion), it is a story that very few people know but fully documented:

The Man Who Never Was
William Martin (RIP) (1943): Operation Mincemeat. Despite indicating his grave in the cemetery of Huelva, this character does not really exist. The creation of her identity was a British counterintelligence ploy to make people believe that the imminent Allied invasion from North Africa through Sicily would not occur. Lieutenant Commander Ewen Montagu, English naval secret service, he commanded what was called Operation Mincemeat. They used the body of a young man with waterlogged lungs with pneumonia do not stop in time by a shortage of penicillin. The identity for the young officer Martin was an abundance of everyday details that sought to be convincing. Included a signed photo of his alleged girlfriend Pamela, a bill for an engagement ring, recent London show tickets, phone numbers, real ... The body was transported on ice by a British submarine and abandoned on the Spanish coast, where it was found in the area known as El Portil, a fisherman in Punta Umbria (Huelva), which led to the authorities. An autopsy ordered by the maritime commander determined a probable drowning of gloom result of an airplane by the German batteries in North Africa. The documents contained in a bag strapped to his wrist described a false Allied attack plans were able to convince Hitler that the Allied invasion would take place in Sardinia and the Greek islands. The significant shift of German units were commanded by deception, helped decisively to the real landing was successful. There is a movie about it is recommended to see.
Wikipedia.

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Additional Photos by angel cornejo (cornejo) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 5692 W: 5 N: 12439] (60956)
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