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Soundtracks

After the Quantum Cloud of my previous post, today another cloud from the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)
This time a Cloud made of red electrical wire hanging like a cloud in the room. But it isn’t just a Red Wired Cloud; It is also a SOUNDCLOUD

The visitors are invited to wear a customized headphone and move along the artwork to experience the fourteen-channel composition.
In the main picture you can see a young lady attentively listening to the sound with her head almost in the cloud. In the two workshops we zoom out and see how the audience deal with the installation.

■ Main picture (Large scalable version) Listening in the cloud
■ Workshop 1 (Large scalable version) Behind the cloud
■ Workshop 2 (Large scalable version) Around the cload

Make: SONY
Model: ILCE-6300
Software: PaintShop Pro 19,00
Exposure Time: 1/200 sec
F-Stop: f/4.5
ISO Speed Ratings: 3200
Focal Length: 43 mm
Date Taken: 2017-08-07 13:53
Metering Mode: Pattern
Flash: Flash did not fire, compulsory flash mode
File Size: 6988 kb

Christina Kubrisch – Cloud
German artist Christina Kubisch, a pioneer of sound art, began using electromagnetic induction in her installations as early as 1978. Since then she has constantly refined her practice of staging the effects of wireless electromagnetic transmissions. Cloud (2011/2017), produced on-site at the museum using thousands of meters of red electrical wire, hosts a fourteen-channel composition that visitors listen to by wearing customized headphones. These devices, developed by the artist, contain magnetic coils that receive the magnetic fields circulating in the cable loops and make them audible. As visitors move around the installation, they look at the chaotic electrical wiring suspended in the gallery but hear the prerecorded sounds programmed into different segments of the sculpture.
………
Kubisch started her series of Clouds in 2011, before the term became a Silicon Valley buzzword for a type of data storage. Uncannily, however, her participatory audio sculptures relate to these topics of storage and access, yet they do so in a theatrical way, turning visitors into active listeners who are constantly seeking to retrieve and mix new sonic impressions by bending down, lying on the floor, or simply turning their heads. (source - Rudolf Frieling – website SFMOMA)

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Additional Photos by Rob Zwemmer (alvaraalto) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 4196 W: 317 N: 6027] (24334)
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