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Photographer's Note

Melbourne is suffering for days now from the smoke that the winds have blown south. At the foothills of Dandenong Ranges, east of Melbourne, it seems to have met a natural wall and sits there until the wind can disperse it all. 100,000 square metres have been scorched in Victoria by 100 or more fires and the continent has lost a billion and a half of its fauna and flora, some of which that were endangered, are now thought to be extinct. rnrnIf one looks at colonial etchings and paintings, plus the very early photos, one can see that the Aboriginal people managed the land using practices accumulated and fine tuned through 40,000 to 60,000 years of connection with the land and its climate. They followed the regular and informed practice of reduction burning, which was based on knowing when to burn the undergrowth so as to minimise the ferocity of fires. Where the native peoples lived and hunted, there were meadows and woodlands. They deliberately created open country for kangaroos and emus, a form of free range farming. Now in those areas that were safe, there are (or there were) thick forests with tinder dry undergrowth- a formula for disaster like we are experiencing now. There is talk only recently to adopt some of the practices of the original inhabitants of this continent and so avoid such vast and ferocious fires and immense destruction.

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Photo Information
  • Copyright: Klaudio Branko Dadich (daddo) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 3578 W: 114 N: 6362] (28728)
  • Genre: Lieux
  • Medium: Couleur
  • Date Taken: 2020-01-14
  • Categories: Nature
  • Exposition: 1/160 secondes
  • Versions: version originale
  • Date Submitted: 2020-01-14 16:35
Viewed: 152
Points: 22
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Additional Photos by Klaudio Branko Dadich (daddo) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 3578 W: 114 N: 6362] (28728)
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